Humans are captivated by stories. Stories draw people in–they take raw facts and infuse them with meaning and significance. But is it acceptable to take the facts of someone’s life and turn them into an entertaining story? Are we, on the other hand, obligated to make stories of human suffering interesting? And what does that actually mean in practice? When is it okay for someone to tell a story that isn’t their own? Beth Benedix is a professor of religious studies, world literature and community engagement and in her book Ghost Writer (A Story about Telling a Story), she explores the ethics of narrative. In this episode, we introduce the man at the center of her story, Joe Koenig. He’s a Holocaust survivor with an amazing testimony of survival. Beth discusses what it meant to take on telling his story, and the importance of sharing stories of suffering.

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This episode’s transcript is coming soon.

Show Notes:

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Featured image “Needle and Thread” is by Luke Nadeau, CC BY 2.0.

    1. Drone Pine (Simple Treescape variation)” by Blue Dot Sessions
      From sessions.blue
      CC BY-NC 4.0
    2. Gathering Stasis” by Blue Dot Sessions
      From sessions.blue
      CC BY-NC 4.0
    3. Partly Sage (Atmo with Marimba variation)” by Blue Dot Sessions
      From sessions.blue
      CC BY-NC 4.0
    4. Shade Ways (1 Min variation)” by Blue Dot Sessions
      From sessions.blue
      CC BY-NC 4.0
    5. Lakeside Path” by Blue Dot Sessions
      From sessions.blue
      CC BY-NC 4.0

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